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NMC Applications & Forms

  • Drug Testing Form CG-719P
  • Alternatively, mariners may submit a letter from their employer confirming that the mariner is subject to a random drug testing program and containing the following language:
    “(APPLICANT’S NAME/SSN) has been subject to a random testing program meeting the criteria of Title 46 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 16.230 for at least 60 days during the previous 185 days, and has not failed nor refused to participate in a chemical test for dangerous drugs.”  This paragraph can be included in the mariner’s sea-time letter.
  • Finding a Drug Testing Site

Mariners whose sea service has been acquired on vessels less than 200 GT may document their service either by a letter from their employer or form CG-719S.

Occasionally even the finest people find themselves entangled with the law. As part of the evaluation process for a prospective officer, the Coast Guard wants to know details. One or even multiple prosecutions or convictions will not necessarily scotch the deal. Nonetheless, the candidate for a credential must disclose certain information. A relatively new form, CG-719C, can be used for this purpose.  Remember that while the TWIC screening will return a history, it is extremely important that the Coast Guard also be informed by the mariner as well.

Given the complexity of a sea-going career, mariners are not always able to keep meticulous copies of sea-time submitted on previous license applications. Fortunately the Coast Guard almost always has access to those earlier submissions. To get a copy of one’s record (including already submitted sea-time), mariners can submit a records request using the Correspondence Request form.

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Even before our family migrated to the US from Ireland, Crawfords were water-borne. Our grandfather sailed around Cape Horn (and was swept overboard) on the Sailing Bark “Fingal.”  A subsequent wave swept him back. One of our father’s ships was torpedoed and sunk in World War II.  A second was caught in the sights of a kamikaze pilot. Grandfather, father, uncles, cousins and brothers have served as Ordinary Seamen, Able-Bodied Seamen and the range of officers from Third Mate to Masters of their own vessels.   Their ships — fishing boats, tankers, towboats, container ships —  have carried cargoes ranging from oil to lions and tigers to all parts of the globe.  Here are photos of a few of their vessels.

Crawford Nautical School

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